Robert H. King Speaks on Solitary Confinement & The Angola 3

Robert King, who spent decades in solitary confinement as part of the Angola 3
Robert King, who spent decades in solitary confinement as part of the Angola 3

Tuesday, April 8 come out and hear Robert H. King speak on his experiences in solitary confinement in Angola Prison. The talk will be held in Lecture Hall 2 at the Evergreen State College, from 5-7PM.

Robert H. King is a freed member of the Angola 3. Along with his comrades Albert Woodfox and Herman Wallace (who has recently passed away), they were targeted for their activism as members of the Black Panther Party inside Angola prison in the 1970s. After 31 years in Angola prison in Louisiana, 29 spent years in solitary confinement, Robert King was released on February 2001 after proving his innocence.

Since his release, Robert H. King has spoken across the country demanding the release of Albert Woodfox along with the end of solitary confinement. King will speak about his own experience in Angola Prison as a Black Panther, the case of the Angola 3, and will explain how the prison system refuses to free Albert Woodfox even after his conviction has been overturned three times!

History of the Angola 3

41 years ago, deep in rural Louisiana, three young black men were silenced for trying to expose continued segregation, systematic corruption, and horrific abuse in the biggest prison in the US, an 18,000 acre former slave plantation called Angola.

Peaceful, non-violent protest in the form of hunger and work strikes organized by inmates caught the attention of Louisiana’s elected leaders and local media in the early 1970s. They soon called for investigations into a host of unconstitutional and extraordinarily inhumane practices commonplace in what was then the “bloodiest prison in the South.” Eager to put an end to outside scrutiny, prison officials began punishing inmates they saw as troublemakers.

At the height of this unprecedented institutional chaos, Albert Woodfox, Herman Wallace, and Robert King were charged with murders they did not commit and thrown into 6×9 foot solitary cells.

Albert Woodfox’s murder conviction was overturned for a 3rd time in February of last year, and for a third time, the State of Louisiana appealed. As Woodfox, now 67, prepares to enter his 42nd year in solitary confinement, he continues to maintain his innocence.

The third member of the Angola 3, Herman Wallace, was released last October from 41 years of solitary confinement after his conviction was overturned, but died 3 days later of advanced liver cancer at the age of 72. A group of U.S. Congressmen saw fit to mark his passing by entering a tribute to Wallace into the Congressional record, describing him as a “champion for justice and human rights.”

This event is a part of RETHINKING PRISONS MONTH – APRIL 2014!

April Prisoner Letter Writing Day

Abolish Cops and Prisons is hosting a Prisoner Writing Day on Wednesday April 2th from 1:00pm to 3:00pm at the Flaming Eggplant Cafe (The Evergreen State College). All mailing supplies will be provided for free. This will be followed by an ACAP meeting at 3 pm at the Flaming Eggplant.

If you want us to add someone to the list below, let us know! Writing to prisoners is an easy way to express solidarity and to remind them that they are not forgotten.

Charles Sims Africa
#AM-4975
SCI Dallas 1000 Follies Road Dallas, PA 18612

Delbert Orr Africa
#AM-4985
SCI Dallas 1000 Follies Road Dallas, PA 18612

Janet Holloway Africa
#006308
SCI Cambridge Springs 451 Fullerton Avenue Cambridge Springs, Pennsylvania 16403

Janine Phillips Africa
#006309
SCI Cambridge Springs 451 Fullerton Avenue Cambridge Springs, Pennsylvania 16403

These are members of the black-liberation group, MOVE. MOVE works towards resisting “man’s system from imposing on life, to stop industry from poisoning the air, water, and soil and to put an end to the enslavement of all life”. Under constant conflict with the Phili Police Dept., police raided their home in Powelton Village in 1978. The raid included SWAT teams, house destruction, tear gas, and fire dept water cannons. One of the police officers involved in the raid was shot and killed. There is no proof that any of the MOVE members shot the cop -all maintain their innocence, yet nine of the folks present were charged with third-degree murder.

Romaine ‘Chip’ Fitzgerald
#B-27527
Kern Valley State Prison D-2-118 Post Office Box 5104 Delano, California 93216 Address envelope to Romaine Fitzgerald, address card to Chip

Romaine ‘Chip’ Fitzgerald is a member of the Southern California Chapter of the Black Panther Party. In September 1969, Chip was wounded and arrested in connection with a police shoot-out. He was tried for assault on police and other, related charges, including the murder of a security guard. He was convicted and sentenced to death. He was 19 years old.

Walter Bond - ALF / Animal Liberation prisoner
Walter Bond

Walter Bond
#37096-013
USP Marion – CMU Post Office Box 1000 Marion, Illinois 62959

Walter Bond is an imprisoned Animal Liberation Front operative who in the Summer of 2010 was arrested for the A.L.F. Lone Wolf arsons of the Sheepskin Factory in Denver, Colorado, the Tandy Leather Factory in Salt Lake City, Utah and Tiburon Restaurant in Sandy, Utah.On February 11, 2011, Bond was sentenced to 5 years in Federal prison for the Colorado fire, and on October 13, 2011, he was sentenced to 7 years, 3 months for the Utah fires, to run consecutive to the first sentence. His expected release date is March 21, 2021. Bond’s experiences as a 19-year-old slaughterhouse construction worker propelled him into Veganism and a life focused on ending our culture’s enslavement and exploitation of animals and the natural world. As a prisoner of the war for the liberation of Animals, Bond continues to influence and motivate other activists dynamically via his essays and public statements

Rebecca Rubin
#770288,
8A20 Multnomah County Inverness Jail 11540 NE Inverness Drive Portland, Oregon 97220

A member of Earth Liberation Front and Animal Liberation Front. Rubin freed 400 wild horses from a federal land management corral in Oregon as others set the property on fire, she also set participated in a setting fire to a ski complex in Colorado.

Brent Betterly
#2012-0519001
Cook County Department of Correction Post Office Box 089002 Chicago, Illinois 60608

A member of Nato-3, three folks who were protesting NATO who were arrested after a no-knock midnight raid of their homes, in which police found materials that indicated allegedly indicated plans for arson.

Kevin Chianella
Joyceville Institution Highway 15
Post Office Box 880
Kingston, Ontario K7L 4X9 Canada

Kevin Chianella received a 2 year prison sentence for his participation in the G20 protests in Toronto in 2010. Chianella, 18 at the time, got a heftier sentence because he attacked a cop car with a canvas bag full of rocks. He is also stated to have fueled and helped sustain the fire that was set upon another cop car (Still in Prison?)

Mumia Abu-Jamal
Mumia Abu-Jamal

Mumia Abu-Jamal
# AM8335
SCI Mahanoy 301 Morea Road
Frackville, Pennsylvania 17932

Mumia Abu-Jamal is a former member of the Black Panther Party and supporter of Philadelphia’s radical MOVE organization. He is an internationally celebrated black writer and radio journalist, author of six books and hundreds of columns and articles and organizer and inspiration for the prison lawyers movement. He has spent the last 30 years in prison, almost all of it in solitary confinement on Pennsylvania’s Death Row. Mumia Abu-Jamal was tried, convicted and sentenced to death in 1982 for the murder of Philadelphia police officer Daniel Faulkner, an incident which took place on December 9,1981.

Brandon Baxter
#57972-060
FDC Oakdale P.O. BOX 5010
Oakdale, LA 71463

Brandon Baxter was part of the Cleveland 4. The Cleveland 4 were four Occupy Cleveland activists. They were arrested on April 30th, 2012. They were accused of plotting a series of bombings, including that of an area bridge. However, the real story is that the FBI, working with an informant, created the scheme, produced the explosives, and coerced these four into participating.

“The Path From Migrant Worker To Criminal To Dignity”: A panel on immigration & incarceration

On April 7 from 3-5PM, come out to the Evergreen State College (SEM II A1105) to see “The Path From Migrant Worker To Criminal To Dignity”, a panel on immigration and mass incarceration.

The path from migrant worker to criminal (flyer) - april 2014In the wake of the current work and hunger strike involving 1,200 detainees at the Northwest Detention Center in Tacoma, Washington, immigrant rights organizers from across the Pacific Northwest will be joining us for a panel discussion concerning the connection between immigration, migrant labor, and incarceration. This panel comes at a time when detainees at the Northwest Detention Center are struggling for human rights and dignity. Each panelist has their own experience organizing around these issues and will bring a unique perspective to the panel.

OUR PANELISTS:

Maru Mora Villalpando – Latino Advocacy and the Dignity Campaign
Maru Mora Villalpando is a bi-lingual statewide community organizer and trainer and Director of Latino Advocacy with more than ten years experience primarily focusing on immigrant rights and racial justice issues. She was one of the lead organizers for the 10th Annual March for Immigrant rights in Seattle, WA where thousands of people demonstrated their support for immigration reform. Ms. Villalpando has been instrumental in grassroots organizing efforts ranging from national health care reform to advocating for changes to the presence of ICE in local police jails through the Secure Communities program. Currently she has been the key community organizer in the recent hunger strikes at the GEO Corp. operated NW Detention Center in Tacoma, WA.
The Dignity Campaign is a national grassroots effort that has crafted a human rights based comprehensive immigration reform platform from the grassroots up, through the convening of Dignity Dialogues.

Edgar Franks – Formacion Civica, C2C
As part of the C2C Team Edgar is the Coordinator for the Formación Cívica (Civic Engagement) Project. He leads the coordination of the Campaign to End Racial Profiling in Whatcom County. Raised in Skagit County, WA, Edgar comes from a farmworker family and is proud of his farm worker roots. He was a member of MEChA throughout High School and College; a volunteer for the Farm Worker Solidarity Organizing Committee from 1999-2011 and Co-Chair of this committee in 2001-2003. Edgar also is a national leader through the Grassroots Global Justice and the National Planning Committee for the US Social Forum. Edgar represents c2C on various local community groups that look for policy solutions to the increased policing through racial profiling of Latino Youth.

Angelica Villa – Community to Community
Angelica is a farm worker and is originally from Oaxaca Mexico and arrived in the United States in 1989 at the age of 18 to start a family in Los Angeles, CA. She is a single mother with four children, ages 10, 14, 17 and 20. She has worked many jobs to provide for them; in the fields, restaurants, and hotels. Angelica lives in rural Whatcom County, which borders Canada and she sees on a daily basis the harassment of workers by the Border Patrol and the cooperation of local police officers with them in detaining farm worker families, many of them Mothers with small children. She is a community organizer with C2C and sees first- hand how quickly hardworking farm workers are racially profiled and labeled criminals and deported. She accompanies them to immigration court hearings and supports their families when they are detained at the NW Detention Center.

Ramon Torres – Familias Unidas por la Justicia
Ramon was elected President of Familias Unidas por la Justicia by over 300 farm workers that went on strike in July of 2013 at Sakuma Bros. Berry Farm. They have since
Formed their own organization and continue to organize for fair wages in the fields and also oppose the federal guest worker program – h2a – which they believe is being used
To displace local experienced farm workers. Most of the members of Familias Unidas por la Justicia are indigenous people from Oaxaca and undocumented. Ramon works daily with entire families that have to deal with making a living while undocumented and also are trying to create a happy life for their children.

Tara Villalba – Raices Culturales Youth Project C2C
Tara leads the Raices Culturales Youth project at c2C. She develops programming that develop leadership within the Latino youth in Whatcom County.
As the key organizer with Latino youth Tara understand the intersection of race, class and gender when it comes to how local police agencies deal with enforcement of
Community policing responsibilities.

We will not comply - hunger strike solidarityThis event is a part of RETHINKING PRISONS MONTH – APRIL 2014. Thanks to our co-sponsors Fist Atevergreen, MEXA de Evergreen, EPIC – Evergreen Political Information Center, and Students for a Democratic Society.

Rethinking Prisons Month @ The Evergreen State College

RETHINKING PRISONS MONTH is a series of events at The Evergreen State College that addresses issues around mass incarceration, the Prison Industrial Complex, and alternatives to police and prisons.

Rethinking prisons month (banner)

WHY THIS MATTERS: 2.5 million people are incarcerated in the United States— the largest prison population in the world, and more prisoners per capita than any other country. Another 8 million people are under some form of correctional supervision, including parole, probation, house arrest, etc. The criminal legal system disproportionately targets people based on race, class, gender, sexuality, and ability, along with people who actively work to undermine these systems of control and domination. Despite these obstacles, it is imperative that we connect across differences to struggle together for our collective liberation, and start building community-based alternatives to the prison-industrial complex.

SCHEDULE OF EVENTS:

April 2 (1pm-3pm) – April Prisoner Writing Day @ The Flaming Eggplant Cafe

April 5 (12pm-5pm) – #Not1More Deportation and Hunger Strike Support Rally @ The Northwest Detention Center in Tacoma, WA.

April 7 (3pm-5pm) -“The Path From Migrant Worker To Criminal To Dignity” – A panel on immigration & incarceration [Sem II A1105]

April 8 (5pm-7pm) – Robert H. King Speaks on Solitary Confinement & The Angola 3 [Lecture Hall 1 @ TESC]

April 9 (3:00pm-4:30pm) – I Am Troy Davis: The Human Impact of The Death Penalty [Recital Hall, COM Bldg @ TESC]

April 9 (6pm-8pm) – Boots Riley on Hip Hop, Mass Incarceration, and Class Struggle (Brought to you by Hip Hop Congress) [The Longhouse @ TESC]

April 10 (5pm-7pm) – “Policing and Counterinsurgency” by Kristian Williams [Lecture Hall 2]

April 11 – (11am-2pm) Greg Lewis – “Radical Self Defense Course” w/ Gregory Lewis [SEM II B1107]

April 14 – (3pm-5pm) Town Hall to discuss State Surveillance of TESC Students [Lecture Hall 3]

April 16 – (3pm-6pm) Bodies Through Bars: Deconstructing Ableism, Abolishing Prisons w/ the AORTA Collective [SEM II E1105 @ TESC]

April 17 – (6pm-9pm) “The House I Live In” film screening [Lecture Hall 1] Brought to you by Evergreen Students for Justice In Palestine

April 18 – (6pm) Film Showing: “The Law in These Parts” (Hosted by Students for Justice In Palestine) [Lecture Hall 1]

April 19 – (9am) “Yet Again As Captives: Mass Incarceration in the U.S. & Palestine” featuring Angela Davis and Noura Erakat.

April 23 – (3pm-5pm) “Prisoner Resistance Past and Present” w/ Ed Mead & Mark Cook from the George Jackson Brigade [Lecture Hall 1]

April 24- May 2– “Don’t Fence Me In”: Art Exhibit on Mass Incarceration in the Student Art Gallery (Hosted by Emily McKown from the CCBLA)

April 26 – (10PM) Books to Prisoners Benefit Show! [at Le Voyeur]

April 27 – Prisoner Support / Prison Abolitionist Potluck

Thank you to our co-sponsors EPIC – Evergreen Political Information Center, Fist Atevergreen, MEXA de Evergreen, Evergreen Students for Justice in Palestine, The Evergreen State College Hip Hop Congress and Students for a Democratic Society!

A Discussion on Decolonization & Transformative Justice, with Danica Brown

Join us on Friday, March 7 at 1:00pm – 2:30pm for A Discussion on Decolonization & Transformative Justice, with Danica Brown in SEM II D1105 at The Evergreen State College.
Discussion on Decolonization & TRansformative Justice - march 2014

This interactive workshop encourages participants to scrutinize power and privilege, systems of oppression and relationships of domination. One of the most striking legacies in American history is that of slavery and genocide. The legacy continues on with the New Jim Crow; the Prison Industrial Complex. This workshop takes history, theory and praxis seriously to flesh out the dynamics of intersectionality that exist between race, class, gender and ethnicity in the American criminal injustice system. Decolonizing our minds starts with revolutionary consciousness surrounding our cultural memory of revolutionary discourse against mass incarceration, torture and gentrification. The end goal is stimulating critical thinking and pushing participants to become more involved in anti-colonial transformative organizing.
,
Danica Brown is Choctaw of the White Crane clan and Scottish of the Ross clan. She is currently enrolled at Portland State University working a doctorate degree in Social Work with a focus in Indigenizing Social Work Practice. She was a member of the Denver/Boulder American Indian Movement and Red Earth Women’s Alliance, focusing her activism on Ending Colonial Legacies in the Americans. Currently she is a collective member of the PDX Anarchist Black Cross, focusing on Decolonizing the Prison Industrial Complex.

This event is a part of No One Wins in Patriarchy Week! Co-hosted by Abolish Cops and Prisons and FIST

No One Wins in Patriarchy Week: Letters to Women & Trans Prisoners

Abolish Cops and Prisons and FIST are hosting a Prisoner Writing Day on Wednesday March 5th from 1:00pm to 5:00pm at the Flaming Eggplant Cafe in Olympia, WA. All mailing supplies will be provided for free.

The patriarchy, yeah we smashin it ...

This month, for No One Wins in Patriarchy Week, we’ll be writing letters to Women & Trans prisoners. If you want us to add someone to the list below, let us know! Writing to prisoners is an easy way to express solidarity and to remind them that they are not forgotten.

WOMEN & TRANS PRISONERS:

Reverend Joy Powell
#07G0632
Bedford Hills CF
P.O. Box 1000
Bedford Hills, NY 10507-2499
As a pastor and a consistent activist against police brutality, violence and oppression in her community, Rev. Joy Powell was warned by the Rochester Police department that she was a target because of her speaking out against corruption. On many occasions Rev. Joy had held rallies and spoke out against the police brutality and “police justifications” in Rochester NY. As a result, Rev. Joy was accused and convicted of 1st Degree Burglary and Assault.

Janine Phillips Africa
#OO-6309
SCI Cambridge Springs
451 Fullerton Ave
Cambridge Springs, PA
16403-1238
Janine Africa served as Minister of Education for the MOVE Organization. Her daugher, Life Africa, was killed at three weeks old by the Philadelphia police. She was later caught in the police raid of the MOVE house where she and eight others were wrongfully convicted of the murder of a police officer who was killed by friendly fire during the raid. She has served over 30 years in prison despite her innocence. Learn more about the MOVE 9 and what you can do to help free Janine at MOVE 9 Parole 2010.

Marie Mason, ELF prisoner
Marie Mason

MARIE JEANETTE MASON #04672-061
FMC Carswell
Federal Medical Center
P.O. Box 27137
Fort Worth, TX 76127

Marie Mason is a 46 year old mother of two. She lived and worked in the Detroit area for most of her life. Like the late Earth First! (EF!) organizer, Judi Bari, she was part of a generation of radicals who worked to link the environmental and labor movements, and was jointly active in both EF! and the Industrial Workers of the World (IWW). She has been charged with involvement with a December,1999 arson at a Michigan State University genetics laboratory at Agriculture Hall and a January, 2000 arson of logging equipment in Mesick, Michigan. Both arsons were claimed by the Earth Liberation Front.

Debbie Sims Africa
#OO-6307
SCI CAMBRIDGE SPRINGS
451 Fullerton Ave
Cambridge Springs, PA
16403-1238

Debbie Sims Africa is a member of the black liberation group MOVE, mother of two and political prisoner who has served over 25 years in prison after the house she was living in was attacked by Philadelphia police. During the raid an officer was killed in friendly fire and all nine MOVE members in the house were falsely charged with his murder. Debbie has been up for parole since 2008, but each year she has been denied. Find out more about the MOVE 9 and the fight for Debbie and her fellow MOVE family’s freedom at www.onamove.com and move9parole.blogspot.com

Janet Holloway Africa, a member of the MOVE 9

Janet Holloway Africa
#OO-6308
SCI CAMBRIDGE SPRINGS
451 Fullerton Ave
Cambridge Springs, PA
16403-1238
Janet Holloway Africa is a member of the black liberation group MOVE, a mother and part of the MOVE 9, nine MOVE members all falsely accused for the murder of a police officer who was shot by friendly fire when the Philadelphia police raided their house.

PVT Bradley Manning (Chelsea)
89289
1300 N Warehouse Rd
Ft Leavenworth KS 66027-2304
USA

On April 4, 2010, whistle-blowing website WikiLeaks published a classified video of a United States Apache helicopter firing on civilians in New Baghdad in 2007. The video, available at www.collateralmurder.com, shows Americans shooting and killing 11 individuals who do not return fire. Two of those killed were Reuters’ employees, including 22 year old Reuters’ photojournalist Namir Noor-Eldeen and his driver, 40 year old Saeed Chmagh. In late May 2010, Private First Class Chelsea Manning, an intelligence analyst with the US Army in Baghdad, was arrested. On June 6, 2010, she was charged with 2 counts of violating the Uniform Code of Military Justice, including eight criminal offenses and four noncriminal violations of Army regulations. The full charge sheet is available at www.bradleymanning.org/3163/charge-sheet-html.

There’ll also be a printed list of more LGBTQ Prisoners, provided by Black and Pink.

February 26: Grand Jury Resistance in the Pacific Northwest and Beyond

grand jury resistance flyer - feb 2014
On July 25, 2012, the FBI and Joint Terrorism Task Force raided three anarchist houses in Portland and served Grand Jury subpoenas in Portland and Olympia, ostensibly as part of an investigation of vandalism during that year’s May Day celebrations in Seattle. Since then multiple people have been imprisoned for refusing to cooperate with the grand jury, and the anarchist milieu in the Pacific Northwest looks a lot different than it did a year and a half ago – some for the better, some much much worse. While all grand jury resisters who were imprisoned have now been released, the investigation continues and multiple resisters are still on the run or in exile.

We will discuss the current state of the investigation, lessons learned from the largest case of state repression of anarchists in the Pacific Northwest in recent memory, and how we might effectively respond to repression in order to come out the other side stronger and more conflictual than before.

March prisoner letter writing day & support for pro-Palestinian political prisoners

Abolish Cops and Prisons and Evergreen Students for Justice in Palestine are hosting a Prisoner Writing Day on Wednesday February 26th from 1:00pm to 3:00pm at the Flaming Eggplant Cafe in Olympia, WA.
justice for holy land five
Come write letters to political prisoners incarcerated here in the United States for supporting the Palestinian struggle for self-determination. It’s an easy way to let them know that they are not forgotten. Unfortunately, we are unable to write to prisoners in Palestine due to the potential backlash that they could receive from Israeli prison administrators; those who receive international mail may be considered to be political leaders and therefore may experience torture and repression on the inside.

Everyone is welcome to write to any prisoner of their choice. All mailing supplies will be provided for free.

Shukri Al-Baker
Shukri Al-Baker, one of the five pro-Palestinian prisoners (known as the “Holy Land Five”) who we will be sending letters of support to.

Pro-Palestinian Political Prisoners:
The Holy Land Foundation is a Muslim charity that has provided direct humanitarian aid to Palestinian refugees and have also helped in Bosnia, Albania, Chechnya, Turkey and the United States. They have been accused of providing money to organizations linked to Hamas, something the HLF has adamantly denied. The five defendants are: Ghassan Elashi, Shukri Abu-Baker, Mufid Abdulqader,Abdulrahman Odeh, Mohammad El-Mezain, Haitham Maghawri and Akram Mishal. The last two are not in the US.

————————–———————–

We’ll also be writing to other US political prisoners who have birthdays in March:

March 3rd
Dylan Sutherlin M34022
P.O. Box 7711
Centralia, IL 62801

Saturday May 19, 2012 five men were arrested in Tinley Park, a Chicago Suburb, for allegedly assaulting a number of white-supremacist organizers. The five have identified themselves as anti-fascist organizers, active with groups in Indiana, including HARM (Hoosier Anti-Racist Movement). In January, 2013, all five of the accused accepted non-cooperating plea bargains. They are currently serving prison sentences ranging from 3.5 to 6 years.

March 5th
Reverend Joy Powell
#07G0632
Bedford Hills CF
P.O. Box 1000
Bedford Hills, NY 10507-2499
As a pastor and a consistent activist against police brutality, violence and oppression in her community, Rev. Joy Powell was warned by the Rochester Police department that she was a target because of her speaking out against corruption. On many occasions Rev. Joy had held rallies and spoke out against the police brutality and “police justifications” in Rochester NY. As a result, Rev. Joy was accused and convicted of 1st Degree Burglary and Assault.

March 17th
Jason Sutherlin M34023
East Moline Correctional Center
100 Hillcrest Road
East Moline, Illinois 61244

Saturday May 19, 2012 five men were arrested in Tinley Park, a Chicago Suburb, for allegedly assaulting a number of white-supremacist organizers. The five have identified themselves as anti-fascist organizers, active with groups in Indiana, including HARM (Hoosier Anti-Racist Movement). In January, 2013, all five of the accused accepted non-cooperating plea bargains. They are currently serving prison sentences ranging from 3.5 to 6 years.

political prisoner jaan karl laaman
Jaan Karl Laaman, currently serving a 53 year sentence for his actions as part of the United Freedom Front, during the 1980s

March 17th
Ruchell Cinque Magee
# A92051
D-5 #1
P.O. Box 4670
Lancaster, CA 93539
Personal Background
Ruchell Cinque Magee is the longest held political prisoner in the U.S., having been locked up since 1963. Politicized in prison, he later participated in the Marin Countyh Courthouse Rebellion, the attempted liberation of political prisoner Johnathan Jackson. He has worked tirelessly as a jailhouse lawyer, working on his own case and helping many other prisoners win their freedom.

March 21st
Jaan Karl Laaman #10372-016
USP Tucson
PO Box 24550
Tucson, AZ 85734
Jaam Karl Laaman grew up in Roxbury, MA and Buffalo, NY. His family emigrated to the US from Estonia when he was a child. He has a son. He is currently serving a 53 year prison sentence for his role in the bombings of United States government buildings while a member of the United Freedom Front, an American leftist group which robbed banks, bombed buildings, and attacked law enforcement officers in the 1980s.

“Visions of Abolition” Film Screening & Group Discussion on Prison Abolition

Come join us on Thursday, February 20 in Lecture Hall 2, to watch the film Visions of Abolition, a new feature length documentary about the prison industrial complex and the prison abolition movement. There will be a brief discussion after the film about prison abolition.

Visions of abolition - documentary about prison abolition and mass incarceration in the United States

Part I “Breaking down the Prison Industrial Complex” weaves together the voices of women caught in the criminal justice system, and leading scholars of prison abolition, examining the racial and gendered violence of the prison system. Our film features the work of Susan Burton, a formerly incarcerated mother who established A New Way of Life, a group of transition homes for women coming home from prison in South Los Angeles (39 mins).

Part II “Abolition: Past Present and Future,” documents the recent history of the prison abolition movement through the organizing efforts of Critical Resistance and explores the meaning of abolitionist politics. By focusing on the collaboration between Critical Resistance and A New Way of Life, (known as the L.E.A.D. Project) the second half of the film unfolds a vision of abolition in practice (48 mins).

TRAILER: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C9BODVxzNQk

How The Film Was Made

The direct material catalyst and inspiration for this film was a videography project, undertaken by Cameo Watkins and Patricia Naqi. As interns with the L.E.A.D. Project, (a sub-project of Critical Resistance, Los Angeles) they conducted video interviews with community members in Watts about their experiences with the police. After viewing their footage, Setsu Shigematsu, Jolie Chea and Cameron Granadino and other students at UCR decided to embark on a new film project about the politics of prison abolition, as an urgent alternative to the failure of the criminal justice system.

About the Filmmakers

Director, Writer & Producer:
Setsu Shigematsu has worked as a volunteer educator and organizer with the LEAD Project since 2005. She is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Media and Cultural Studies at the University of California Riverside Campus.

Editor & Co-Producer:
Cameron Granadino is a Media and Cultural Studies Major from the University of California, Riverside. He is an Independent Filmmaker, and member of Active Students Against Prisons and Policing.

Assistant Producer:
Jolie Chea is a member of Critical Resistance-Los Angeles and has participated in the LEAD Project since 2006. She is also a graduate student in American Studies & Ethnicity at USC.

Olympia Books To Prisoners Speaks: Offsetting the Dehumanizing Effects of Prison One Book at a Time

Event Description: “We will have an opening workshop to shed light on who is in prison and why. We will give the history of Books to Prisoners and talk about how we run, what we do and why. We’ll read letters and discuss the implications of prison conditions through the requests of those incarcerated.”

When: February 12, 2014 at 3PM

Location: SEM II D1107 at The Evergreen State College

Books to prisoners flyer - feb 2014

ABOUT BOOKS TO PRISONERS:
Books To Prisoners (BTP) is a Seattle-based, all-volunteer, nonprofit organization that sends books to prisoners in the United States. BTP believes that books are tools for learning and opening minds to new ideas and possibilities. By sending books to prisoners, we hope to foster a love of reading and encourage the pursuit of knowledge and self-improvement.

Founded in the early 1970s and sponsored by Left Bank Books, BTP receives 1,200 to 1,300 requests for books each month. Volunteers work two evenings a week opening letters, finding books in our collection that correspond to the request, and wrapping and mailing parcels. Because of continuing backlog of requests, prisoners sometimes wait up to six months to receive their books.

Prisoners request a variety of books. Most prisons accept paperback books only. The most popular requests are dictionaries, thesauruses, African American history and fiction, Native American studies, legal material, GED materials, and languages (particularly Spanish.) Other common requests include fiction, vocational-technical manuals, politics, anthropology, art and drawing, psychology, and health and fitness.